Buckinghamshire Way 3.3: On to Milton Keynes and Wolverton

From Great Horwood, I followed the route leading first north to Nash (which is not a Regency folly as it sounds), then east.  On this stretch I was very glad that I was using the full 1:25 000 scale Ordnance Survey Explorer map; Ordnance Survey Explorer 192 (Buckingham and Milton Keynes). The subtlety required to find the path is only at that scale.  Here as elsewhere, the path (I was following the North Bucks Way all day) was alternately clear and broad and completely invisible.  It would vanish at a field boundary.

Eastward then I came to Waddon, a goodly village and the last before the vast, swallowing bulk of Milton Keynes.  There is a broad cordon sanitaire between the two, at present.  The great town is clearly visible to the east from the path as it leaves the village, and I had to walk towards it.

Before diving into Milton Keynes, the path stops, and meets a north-south track along the edge of the town; I followed that north.  Here it is a footpath and bridleway carved with the needs of the mighty town in mind, so I is good and convenient walking, if not of great fascination.  On occasion there are new developments springing up right to the edge of the path.  How the developers would long to overleap the fence are pour concrete onto acres and acres more! For now they are constrained by that boundary.

New bits of Milton Keynes

Eventually I emerged on a road and walked to a path which led through a couple of neighbourhoods.  If I have to be honest, the back end of Milton Keynes is not where  chose t spend my walking time.  It is a convenient route still, and through I went just for a sort time, as eventually the path entered a park and led to the Grand Union Canal, which I followed to the station.

The whole route is 22 miles.  That was Day 3 done.  The rest of the way is more complicated, but should be shorter.

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